Electrical Installation Certificate

Electrical Installation Certificate

Electrical Installation Certificate

The Electrical Installation Certificate is required for:
– New installations
– When a new circuit or circuits are installed to an existing installation
– The changing of a consumer unit (distribution board)
– When a circuit is altered and the alteration requires changing of the protective device.

After the initial verification, once the full inspection and testing procedure has been carried out, an Electrical Installation Certificate must be completed. This is legally required.

To be valid the Electrical Installation Certificate must be accompanied by a:
– the Schedule of Inspections
– the Schedule of Test Results.

The original document must be given to the “person ordering the work” and a copy should be kept by the electrician who completed the inspection and testing.

The Electrical Installation Certificate is to be used only for the initial certification of a new installation or for an alteration or addition to an existing installation where new circuits have been introduced.

It is not to be used for a Periodic Inspection for which a Periodic Inspection Report form should be used. For an alteration or addition which does not extend to the introduction of new circuits, a Minor Electrical Installation Works Certificate may be used.

The original Certificate is to be given to the person ordering the work (Regulation 742-01-03). A duplicate should be retained by the contractor.

 

Who is responsible for making sure that electrical work in your home meets the requirements of Part P?

By law, the homeowner or landlord must be able to prove that all electrical installation work meets Part P, or they will be committing a criminal offence.

Local authorities have the power to make homeowners or landlords remove or alter any work that does not meet the requirements of the Building Regulations.

What electrical work is notifiable?

From April 2013 electrical work in a dwelling, or associated with its surroundings, is notifiable to a local building control body where the work includes:

  • the installation of a new circuit, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage); or
  • the replacement of a consumer unit (fusebox); or
  • any alteration or addition to an existing circuit in a special location*, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage

*A special location is a room containing a bath or shower, swimming pool or a sauna heater.

An alteration or addition to an existing circuit in a room containing a bath or shower is notifiable only where carried out in the space surrounding a bath or shower.

An alteration or addition anywhere within a room containing a swimming pool or sauna heater is notifiable.

Who is responsible for making sure that electrical work in your home meets the requirements of Part P?

By law, the homeowner or landlord must be able to prove that all electrical installation work meets Part P, or they will be committing a criminal offence.

Local authorities have the power to make homeowners or landlords remove or alter any work that does not meet the requirements of the Building Regulations.

Who is responsible for making sure that electrical work in your home meets the requirements of Part P?

By law, the homeowner or landlord must be able to prove that all electrical installation work meets Part P, or they will be committing a criminal offence.

Local authorities have the power to make homeowners or landlords remove or alter any work that does not meet the requirements of the Building Regulations.